Russ Brown http://www.qosb.cn Tue, 07 Jul 2020 02:33:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.4 http://www.qosb.cn/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/favicon.png Russ Brown http://www.qosb.cn 32 32 New World Record: Biggest Flag Flown On A Motorcycle http://www.qosb.cn/new-world-record-biggest-flag-flown-on-a-motorcycle/ Tue, 07 Jul 2020 02:31:07 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45063     The world record for largest flag ever flown on a motorcycle, set and then set again. Rider: Terry Madden (@terry_madden) Sponsored by: Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys (@russbrownmotorcycleattorneys) The world record ride was completed on July 1, 2020 with a 12’x18′ flag and then set again with a 15’x25′ flag. Film was produced by […]

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The world record for largest flag ever flown on a motorcycle, set and then set again. Rider: Terry Madden (@terry_madden) Sponsored by: Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys (@russbrownmotorcycleattorneys) The world record ride was completed on July 1, 2020 with a 12’x18′ flag and then set again with a 15’x25′ flag. Film was produced by Tobacco Motorwear (@tobaccomotorwearco) with the support of many talented cinematographers, photographers and volunteers. The custom flag mount was fabricated by Terry Madden. These giant flags were pulled by a 2001 Harley Davidson Road King Police Edition motorcycle. 4 rides were made, 3 with the first flag and 1 with the second larger flag.

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2LaneLife – Highwaymen http://www.qosb.cn/2lanelife-highwaymen/ Fri, 03 Jul 2020 01:06:16 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45047 There’s a couple of new kids in YouTube town. Gaylin?Anderson and Lance Coury are the owners of 2LaneLife, a growing channel, website, store and blog. Who are the Highwaymen you ask? They’re not what I was expecting, and they’re not what you’re expecting, either. For starters, Gaylin and Lance aren’t anywhere near fitting into the […]

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There’s a couple of new kids in YouTube town. Gaylin?Anderson and Lance Coury are the owners of 2LaneLife, a growing channel, website, store and blog. Who are the Highwaymen you ask?

They’re not what I was expecting, and they’re not what you’re expecting, either.

For starters, Gaylin and Lance aren’t anywhere near fitting into the typical YouTube motovlogger demographic. They’re both married family men and successful businessmen in unrelated industries. Lance is a grandfather (and a strapping one at that).

Then and Now: Gaylin Anderson with his family.

 

They have no claim to fame, unless you count Lance’s son winning an XGames gold medal and starting a successful moto-business, which isn’t even listed in the about section of their website. They have no massive corporate support system like the backing of an OEM. They’re just 2 guys who love #bikelife.

Lance Coury with his always-growing family.

 

And yet, they’ve started a YouTube channel that is both entertaining and educational for riders looking to gain experience on the open road with no apologies. And they’re on a roll with nearly 1000 subscribers.

 

 

To top it off, they don’t have a schtick like uber-safety-superheroes or compassionate-charity-crusaders. They don’t hide their identities or their faces. They openly declare their love for American roads, Harley-Davidsons, people and natural beauty without making anyone feel unwelcome. In fact, if they did have a schtick, it would be that they make everyone feel welcome. Watch one video and you’ll want to pull up a camp chair, pull up beside them on a backroad, or crack open a beer – seriously, whatever floats your boat because these guys are the real deal, guaranteed.

 

 

What you won’t find in 2LaneLife videos: No hoaky one-liners, no staged experiences, no crazy shock-inducing vlogger drama, and no claim to expertise beyond their personal experience.

 

What you will find in 2LaneLife videos: 5-30 minutes of open road, a “gosh-dang it’s a beautiful day” or two, a few laughs, new friends nearly every episode, and nourishment of your never ending wanderlust.

 

 

How did this whole thing get started? Lance and Gaylin have been riding together for 5 years, but have been friends for much longer. Over the last 25+ years, they each raised their own families while maintaining a friendship. As friendship often does, those separate lives became an intermingled family with Lance and Gaylin developing a dynamic that was unmistakable. “Our families encouraged us to do this,” they both explained together. Once on camera, the friendship is undeniable, and contagious!

 

 

Their goal is simple: document their adventures and let others join in on the fun. So these two guys are traveling around America, sometimes solo and sometimes with their wives or friends, eating good food, meeting cool people, learning new lessons, and sharing it with everyone “whether they ride or not, it doesn’t matter.” They’re also sharing information on their favorite tried and true gear and accessories, which can be purchased directly from their website (convenient!), because they’ve become dealers for the brands they believe in the most. You’ll even find instructional videos on how-to [fill in the blank here] your Harley.

 

 

The Highwaymen don’t care who you are, how much money you make, what you ride or even if you ride. They just want you along for the ride.

For more 2LaneLife, check out their Website,?Follow them on Facebook, Instagram, and Subscribe to their Youtube Channel.

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All in with Nate Biccum http://www.qosb.cn/all-in-with-nate-biccum/ Wed, 17 Jun 2020 22:20:38 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=44508 The post All in with Nate Biccum appeared first on Russ Brown.

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Article by Becky Goebel @actuallyitsaxel

Nate Biccum Portrait

Known for his art displays at motorcycle shows, Nate Biccum in a staple in the motorcycle culture. He’s a good-guy vibe expert who I was introduced to through this blog post assignment. The crew at Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys? had seen his art display at Born Free last year where Nate had a deck of cards at his booth. Each card had an art piece on it that showed a different personality from the motorcycle industry: Painters, Builders, Racers, Announcers etc. When Nate first sent me photos of the deck, I loved it. I recognized a couple of the personalities he had drawn. With tons of friends in common, I was surprised I hadn’t met Nate before.

The Deck.

After a couple days of back and fourth, I really got the idea that Nate was a kind of guy that doesn’t judge others for their bike choice, their taste in music, or what they look like. He really is a vibes guy, someone who clicks with people and can read people based on more than just their exterior, and Nates boogie van goes right along with that attitude.

 

Nate’s Van

 

Growing up in the 80s in Orange, Nate was a part of the skateboard scene. He compared the motorcycle community to his past in the skateboard world and said something that really stuck with me: “You had the punk rock skaters, the hip-hop style skaters, the trendy guy skaters etc. and just a bunch of different cliques of skateboarders. They aren’t the same, but they all skateboard. We all got along – we were just into different things. There’s a ton of cross over and although we are associated as “the same” to the public world, we aren’t. There is so much cross-over and that’s like how the motorcycle culture is these days.”

I really resonate with this outlook because at an event like Born Free, from the outsiders eye, everyone there “looks the same” or “is the same” because we’re all into bikes. But we aren’t, everyone has their own style, their own taste and their own personality – and that’s what Nate, and this article is all about: capturing those differences and highlighting them as an art piece that you can see and touch.

“The whole community isn’t just about motorcycles – it’s about the people”

Personalities on paper.

 

I decided to ask Russ Browns favorite personality, and one of the faces on Nate cards, Dump Truck, what he thought of Nate Biccum, and this is what he said: “He’s a fun-loving, kind-hearted artist. He wanted to make me a part of his deck of cards and I told him I was happy to be apart of it and I would promote him any way I could. We’ve just enjoyed each other hanging out ever since. The first time I met him was at a party, then after that it was just like a mutual ‘you’re cool man, I wanna help you, you’re tight, I wanna do stuff’. That’s the kind of person I like.”

It’s cool to do these stories on people who you didn’t know before. I now have a new buddy and also learnt about a new artist who is extremely talented. Nate is a full-time graphic designer who does outsourced freelance work as well. He has done work with lots of companies in the motorcycle industry and likes the idea of the culture being intertwined: The Show Bikes having multiple skills from multiple people come together to bring the bike alive, events having riders team up to host a party, artists who do the art for the events etc. This article has turned out like that as well, a couple riders coming together to create some stuff for you readers to learn and read about. With that thought, here’s some more about Nate in his own words!

Where are you from?

Orange County born and raised, but I also grew up in Maui for a few years. I am currently living and loving life in Dana Point with my girlfriend Emma and our little buddy Zia (Sphynx cat).

Current occupation?

I am a full-time Graphic Designer

 

Suicide Machine Graphic Design Job

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Sign Painting

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Babes Ride Out Graphic

 

What shows/events has your art been a part of?

I have shown at Bornfree, IV League Flat Track, Race on The Rez, Art Ride CA at Legacy Brewing Co. to name a few.

 

Nate’s display at Born Free

 

Why do you love art?

It’s such a powerful way to release expression, creativity and problem solving no matter what the medium is. My favorite part of the process is sharing it with others and hopefully they will enjoy it as well.

Bike art by Nate

 

Influences/inspiration?

Music is a huge part of my life and I cannot imagine doing art without it. Things like DIY/Punk Culture, Skateboarding, Hot Rod/Motorcycle Culture… so many friends and other artists that are out there doing their own thing. Major early influences include Dali, Picasso and Basquiat. I can name many other current artists, but I believe these are the classic ones that influenced me early on. The list can go on and on!

What inspired the playing card deck?

I started doing these Moto inspired illustrations based off of photos of my friends and people I dig what they are doing in the Moto community. After a while (about a year or so) I had accumulated a lot of these illustrations and felt like doing something with them… a deck of playing cards just seemed to make sense. It’s been fun to see the progression of it, as well as the finished product. I have 3 uncut “proof” sheets of the entire deck and will get them framed soon. Kinda?neat-o.

 

A card from Nates deck

 

One of the people on the cards is Dump Truck. Every time you hangout with him, it’s awesome. I try and personalize every card. Dump Trucks is pretty straight forward – He’s on his old Sportster, with a dumbstruck beside him. As soon as you start talking to him, it makes you in the best mood. You get a positive vibe and start laughing. I’m always talking about funny shit when I’m with these guys. They’re hilarious. They love bikes and camping, racing and really make up the whole culture – and really that’s what it’s about. We all love bikes, and all types of bikes. I don’t care what kind of bike it is – its about the people.

DumpTruck Art by Nate Biccum

 

Some are friends of mine and some aren’t. Some of them are painters and fabricators I haven’t met but what they do blows me away. Its a years worth of illustrations and at the end of the year – I decided to make a deck of cards. I actually made the deck so you could buy them. They sold out so fast. They’ll be back up for sale soon!

Are you doing another set of cards?

I am in the process of setting up my second deck of playing cards. This will include illustrations of friends and things I have done since my first deck was made.

What is your background with motorcycles?

I am into all kinds of bikes and have been riding for about 15 years or so. I have a 2006 Harley Street Bob. My first bike was a 1981 Honda CB 650 that?I cut up.

Nate’s bike
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What’s the correlation between motorcycles and your art?

I feel like motorcycles are an?art-form… mechanical art. The paintwork and fabrication, the?aesthetic. It’s amazing to see what these guys are?building and the art/design that goes into it all.

 

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What have you been up to recently? Art wise, life wise.

I am currently focusing on offering products (posters, enamel pins, stickers,?t-shirts, etc.) on my Big Cartel Site. I am going to add more pop culture type stuff as well. I recently did a ZZ Top design for a shirt and an Easy Rider?t-shirt that has Dennis Hopper as Billy with a quote from the movie. I recently just finished up my first enamel pin which has an illustration that was originally painted on the back of my friend Constancio’s Pinto wagon. It is an illustration of Falcor from the movie Neverending Story, but it says “Neverending Party” instead. When I first saw it I was blown away and I asked my friend if I could make some enamel pins out of it. They turned out sweet and I sent him a few.

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Dennis Hopper Design
Never Ending Party

 

I will probably do one of our 1970 Ford Econoline E100 van next. We had our friend Jen paint “Speed Kills” on the back of it so the pin will probably have that on it.

 

I really like to make things and hopefully those things can go out in the world and make people laugh and be enjoyed. I think the Nacho Libre illustration I did recently brings the biggest laugh so far. It is Nacho riding in his cart from the movie…?I?gotta give Emma props for making sure I drew his pinky out on his throttle hand. Nachooooooo

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Is Graphic Design your main job?

I have been doing Graphic Design for over 15 years in different industries. So doing this?Moto illustration work has been really freeing and keeps it fun. I would love to work for myself and keep doing things like what I have been doing and keeping it fun.

Nates business cards

 

What are your goals with your artwork?

I am just trying to come up with things that I dig and have fun with it all. Hopefully people dig it too.

Where can people see your work in real-life? Up coming displays, work out on the streets/by companies, etc.

They can see my art on Instagram at @n8biccum or my hashtag #n8illustrate / my Big Cartel Site (which I am currently adding products to) at n8illustrates.bigcartel.com

Thanks for your time Nate! Can’t wait to meet you in person soon!

All photos are provided and owned by Nat Biccum

View Nate Biccum’s Photo Gallery Here!

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10 Things to Know About Dumptruck http://www.qosb.cn/10-things-to-know-about-dumptruck/ Wed, 10 Jun 2020 01:01:24 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=44503 The post 10 Things to Know About Dumptruck appeared first on Russ Brown.

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A voice you’ll never forget, and a man you might remember–that is, if y’all didn’t party too hard at whatever motorcycling event you met each other at. This is the way most people will describe their first encounter with my very good friend, Dumptruck. …Yes. His name is Dumptruck.

The first time I met Dumptruck, I had recently been in a motorcycle accident and had plenty of road rash on my arms, and bruises on my body, from the impact. As I walked through the Harley-Davidson activation at an NHRA race event, this unique voice came on over the microphone and said, “Hey! Looks like you fell down. Maybe you should get better at walking! Actually, I think I know who you are. You’re the girl in the Harley commercial!” I laughed. He Laughed. We instantly became friends. Nine years later, we’ve ridden countless miles together, and I’ve gotten to know who the man behind the microphone is.

If you’ve been a part of the motorcycling community in any capacity, chances are you have heard him on that same microphone, his voice bellowing throughout a campsite in the late night hours, or you’ve seen him in his tuxspeedo, getting a tan on his upper thighs and stomach, which boasts a unicorn tattoo and “ridiculous” scripture across his torso.?

Everyone will remember their first time hearing Dumptruck. But most people probably haven’t heard the story behind one of the industry’s favorite characters and event hosts. Here’s 10 things to know about Dumptruck!

1. Some people probably think you live in your Econoline van, but I know you’ve had permanent addresses all over the nation. Tell us the story!

Born in Hattiesburg, MS and raised in south Louisiana, southeast Texas, and finally Memhis, TN where I graduated high school. After returning to Memphis from the Navy in 2002, I had an urge to keep going. To move somewhere I knew nothing about. The high frequency of adventure I had become accustomed to was no longer laid out before me. I had to go get it. So, I went to Denver, CO. That was where I became a daily rider.?

Denver was a great place to start again. Roads were open and wild, beer was an important part of life (I actually drove a Budweiser truck), and the mountains had a way of drawing you in whenever time allowed. It was then that I also started to emcee events of all kinds for an array of clients. I decided that after driving a semi, bouncing, bartending, and announcing women’s roller derby, it was time to keep going west for a new version of an old address. Southern California.

It was there that I really took to the road. So much, in fact, that I never really had a regular address for the 8 years I was in the southern reaches of the Golden State. I just lived on a motorcycle riding from one show to the next, trying to stretch a dollar as far as I could, only to return to a short term lease, guest room, or my van. It was the freest time of my life.

Now, I’m in NOLA (New Orleans), where I’ve recently started my next adventure.

Dumptruck’s 2019 Harley-Davidson Road King
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2. Since you’ve been everywhere….what’s your favorite area of the country to ride?

This is pretty much the ultimate question for a rambler, or anyone who has traveled those two-laned pathways across this great country. When I ride through the west I always feel freest. Like standing in the saddle wasn’t really that dangerous because you felt confident no one was watching. So many empty miles past natural monuments, streams to float in, city stops to let some steam off in the evenings with friends. It feels like everyone you know rides there. So many do. In the west, there’s plenty of room for freedom, community, and solitude.?

3. How did you get your nickname?

Oh God. I got the name, “Dumptruck” went I smashed through four guys with my face. A girlfriend of ours said it looked like a truck dumped everybody in one place. BOOM. I am Dumptruck!

4. So…what do you do exactly?

Ha ha! Currently, I’m the sales director for Royal-T Racing along with 50 other hats I like to wear there. I’m really proud to work there. Patrick Tilbury is a quality guy that makes quality equipment. I also emcee motorcycle rallies, concert festivals, experiential marketing events, record voice over and help generate sales through brand ambassadorships. Oh yeah, I also shoot and edit photo/video. I do stuff and things. A lot of stuff and things.

5. How did you get into public speaking?

I was brought up in a very musical family. I was fortunate to come up in some pretty great school music programs. The stage was always a comfortable place for me. Then, I became a radio DJ in Memphis where I had to announce acts at concerts. I’m still on a pretty good roll.

6. When did you begin to feel more a part of the motorcycle community?

Easy. The 2013 El Diablo Run. Even after riding through all 48 lower states I still wasn’t really a part of any community. I just liked to do my own thing. Most of my work was always in front of thousands of people. Most of my miles were me on recharge.

EDR changed all of that. I didn’t know anything about it until three days before. It was the only break from the road I’d have all year but I couldn’t help but find out what a good ol’ dirtbag motorcycle run was all about. I’ll tell you this: It introduced me to what would soon become by family. Many of the people in my life today are from that one party. You were there Staci, you know what I’m talking about.

I do know what he’s talking about! It’s where the tuxspeedo also made it’s first public appearance in the motorcycle community, and it was never forgotten.

DumpTruck FXR
7. Based on your experience in the motorcycle world, where do you see it going at the manufacturer level?

With the way we’ve watched the OEM’s evolve over recent years, I see an age of diversity on the horizon. It’s like they’re actually listening to us riders finally and I love it!? Motorcycles aren’t meant for everyone, but I do think everyone that is into it will be seeing even more focus on the diversity in the product lines from the manufacturers and custom parts makers.

The newest generation of riders isn’t built on a family motorcycle heritage as much as it has been in the past. It’s built more on living life while you’re still young. Exploring new places with just a duffle bag to explore a plethora of new roads that connect the world and not just the meet ups at bike nights and track days. A crop of people with minimalist and adventurous lifestyle goals are a large part of the influence.

I myself only own Harley’s. But even I feel a change coming when I dream of my future fleet of fun makers based on the new scramblers, adventure models, and naked bikes that are currently available or under development. I want to check out ALL of the ways to have a good time on two wheels, and I think the future does too.

8. A guy that’s ridden everywhere has to know some good food spots. Where’s your favorite place to #RideToFood?!

My favorite experience of riding to food was in Portland, Maine. Under the Portland Headlight Lighthouse there is a spot with some AMAZING lobster rolls and the best strawberry-rhubarb pie I’ve ever consumed. Do yourself a favor and put that spot on your list.?

9. What’s next on the list? Road trips, business plans?

Businesswise, my main focus is helping to grow Royal-T Racing. That doesn’t mean that now that I have my first “official” job in a decade, that I’m done with the two wheeled tomfoolery. Oh no. I’ll still be emceeing some gigs here and there. I’m also getting ready to start releasing some regular digital content so keep your eye on me. Fun is ahead.

Want to know more about Royal-T Racing? Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, or visit our website!?

10. Any positive words you wanna end on?

The only thing worth fighting for is love.?

Follow Dumptruck and his ramblings on Instagram, Facebook!

View More Dumptruck In A Photo Gallery Here!

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A Look Back At T.R.O.G http://www.qosb.cn/a-look-back-at-t-r-o-g/ Thu, 04 Jun 2020 22:16:10 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=44070 T.R.O.G. (The Race of Gentlemen) Santa Barbara Drags 2019, was an event like none other I have ever experienced. This race truly takes you back in time–a time when guys dressed and acted like gentlemen and machines were royalty. Every sense comes alive when the iconic checkered flag guys jump high in the air & […]

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T.R.O.G. (The Race of Gentlemen) Santa Barbara Drags 2019, was an event like none other I have ever experienced. This race truly takes you back in time–a time when guys dressed and acted like gentlemen and machines were royalty. Every sense comes alive when the iconic checkered flag guys jump high in the air & scream “GO”, screeching tires and roaring engines speed down the drag-strip to become a deafening symphony, and the smell of burnt rubber, oil and fuel fills the air.

T.R.O.G is an event which pays much deserved homage to the history and culture of vintage motorcycle and automobile machinery. This iconic race uniquely highlights ladies & gentlemen who are still enthusiasts of the passion, power and hobby that these unforgettable, timeless machines bring.

Gathering a wide array of spectators including those of all ages & ethnicity and celebrities like Keith Hudson, Katy Perry, Orlando Bloom (whom I had the pleasure to meet!) and Mike Wolfe of American Pickers, T.R.O.G captivates the attention of all.

MOTORCYCLE RACERS LINE UP FOR THEIR TURN ON THE DRAG-STRIP. PHOTO BY @LIVEMOTOFOTO
SPONSOR RUSS BROWN MOTORCYCLE ATTORNEYS IS A FAN OF VINTAGE RIDES. PHOTO BY @LIVEMOTOFOTO
SANTA CLARITA HARLEY DAVIDSON’S MARCIE BELK & MIKE WOLFE OF AMERICAN PICKERS. PHOTO COURTESY OF MARCIE BELK
RANDIE RAIGE ALONGSIDE PASTOR KEITH HUDSON (KATY PERRY’S DAD) – PHOTO CREDIT: DANIEL HUERTA
RANDIE RAIGE & KATY: SELFIE BY KATY PERRY

Article photography by: @LIVEMOTOFOTO

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SMASHING Boundaries http://www.qosb.cn/smashing-boundaries/ Fri, 29 May 2020 00:30:11 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=44278 By: Randie Raige of Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys Hello Rider Readers! Randie Raige with Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys here. I was able to catch up and interview one of my all time favorite, female moto inspirations and fellow Russ Brown brand ambassador Ashley “Smash Stunts” Lammela. Although Ashley and I have ridden alongside each other […]

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By: Randie Raige of Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys

Hello Rider Readers!

Randie Raige with Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys here. I was able to catch up and interview one of my all time favorite, female moto inspirations and fellow Russ Brown brand ambassador Ashley Smash Stunts” Lammela.

Although Ashley and I have ridden alongside each other during several events over the years, our connection has been mainly within our helmets.?

I am excited to bring to you guys, her inside scoop of who she is and what she does. Enjoy!

Name: Ashley aka Smash Stunts

Age: 29

Location: Las Vegas, NV

Q. When did you start riding & why?

A. I got my first bike in 2012. I always thought motorcycles were so bad-ass and thought it would be cool to learn how to ride one. After I bought my first bike I fell in love and its all I wanted to do. I rode over 15,000 miles the first year I learned how to ride. I was addicted!

Mission Statement:

Q. What are your ultimate goals in the motorcycle industry as a stunt woman?

A. My ultimate goal in the motorcycle industry is to make an impact that encourages more women to push out of their comfort zone on a motorcycle. Riding can be very intimidating and as women we can be reserved and cautious. But beyond our comfort zone we learn a lot about ourselves that we can apply to every day life.

Q. Any special victories or achievements?

A. I have many personal achievements in riding but I think the one that tops it all is having traveled to nearly every corner of the United States through riding. Stunt riding has blessed me with the opportunity to see so many different cities over the last 8 years and meet so many amazing people. These experiences really top it all!

Q. How often to you practice?

A. Currently, I practice once or twice a week if Im lucky.

Q. How many bikes do you own? Which kind?

A. I own two motorcycles. A 2004 Kawasaki 636 and a 2006 Harley Davidson Sportster 1200. They are so different from each other and each come with their own challenges and benefits which keeps things interesting!

Q. What is the stunt scene like living in Las Vegas?

A. The stunt scene in Vegas is pretty awesome! We are lucky to be able to ride year-round so you can generally catch someone at a local lot to ride with.

Sponsor shout-outs:

I am so thankful for the companies who support me and allow me to keep doing what I love!

Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys

Bassani Xhaust

Legend Suspensions

Lucky Daves

Scorpion Helmets

Where can we find you to stay up to date with your moto adventures?

You can check out all my latest content on Instagram @smashstunts.

Article photography by: Jeff Flaherty
Wendy of Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys alongside Ashley “Smash Stunts” at Born Free 11 2019

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Ride To California State Parks http://www.qosb.cn/ride-to-california-state-parks/ Tue, 19 May 2020 00:15:27 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=44310 Not everyone shares the love I have for California. Many hate on our laws and high cost of living. They point out we’re a crowded state with an unfriendly business climate and gas prices that are some of the highest in the nation. All this is mostly true but what they don’t acknowledge is California […]

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Not everyone shares the love I have for California. Many hate on our laws and high cost of living. They point out we’re a crowded state with an unfriendly business climate and gas prices that are some of the highest in the nation. All this is mostly true but what they don’t acknowledge is California is also home to one of the most robust State Park systems in the great United States of America. We’ve got almost 300 parks in the Golden State compromised of 1.3 MILLION acres. 280 miles of that is coastline (thats the quintessential ride most of the world thinks of when they consider taking a putt in our great state). This giant swath land is also home to 18,000 campsites, which after a long day of riding, make great spots for a motorcyclist to spark a campfire and bed down for the night.

So if California really is home to so many good spots to ride and camp, where should you start? You could work biggest to smallest, in which case you’d end up in the Anza-Borrego desert. Located east of San Diego, this sometimes parched patch of California contains a ton of spots to ride both on-road and off. One of my most favorite day trips is HWY 79 out to San Felipe road, winding down into some of the best twisties you’ll ever encounter and ending in the Borrego Valley for libations and refreshments (try Carlee’s if ya need help staying hydrated). If more riding is what the doctor ordered, head back through Ocotillo and up into Mom’s Julian for Pie?à la?Mode?(Mom’s Pies is my personal go-to). Want to pitch a tent on BLM land for the night, Ocotillo is great for that too. Again, this is only a day trip but it’ll rival damn near any longer ride you’ll find in the entire US of A.

Salton Sea State Recreation Area ?2012, California State Parks. Photo by John Palmer

Red Rock Canyon State Park. ?2015, California State Parks. Photo by Brian Baer

Anza-Borrego Desert State Park ?2015, California State Parks. Photo by Brian Baer

Visit Anza-Borrego Desert State Park ?

Have more time on your hands and want to see more of what the California Park system has to offer? Jettison up to the Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park (named after explorer Jedediah Smith, who was the first American to travel, by land, from the Mississippi River to California in 1826, passing through the area of the future park). Located at damn near the northern most point of state, I suggest accessing it via the 101 on the way so that you can enjoy killer coastal riding coupled with many a spot to warm up over a cup of chowder (hit the CC Diner if the urge strikes). This part of our great state is like no other, weather worn, and rarely too warm to ride through. Once you make it to the park, you’ll be greeted by mighty redwoods and when I say mighty, I mean it. Some of these trees are almost 2,000 years old and dwarf the cars full of tourists that pass through them. This park doesn’t have a ton of campsites (I think around 100) but if you plan ahead, you can usually book one OR if you’re slick, you can most likely find a spot to pitch a tent discreetly for the night. Either way, you won’t be bummed when you wake up amongst these colossal conifers. When you do decide to leave the park, head northeast on the 199 for some killer curves, shaded by more of the aforementioned gentle giants that are known as the California redwoods. If you stay on this route long enough, you’ll end up in Oregon and riding along the remarkable Rogue River but thats a yarn for another time so I’ll save you the details.

Calaveras Big Trees State Park ? 2019, California State Parks. Photo by Brian Baer

Visit Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park

Directions from Crescent City, California to Medford, Oregon.

Deserts drives and coastal cruises are all fine and dandy but our park system also contains some mammoth mountains (pun intended) and some of the best ones can be found along Highway 395. Whether you’re visiting Yosemite (probably Californias’ most popular park and also our first) or Bodie (the ghost town just south of Bridgeport), the 395 is the go-to byway to access some of the best parks around (hot springs too but I won’t be divulging info on those. Google can help ya find a couple but some of the lesser-known ones are still a secret…finding them on yer own is half the fun). Mono Lake is a must-see if you’re in the area. It’s tufa towers are calcium-carbonate spires that spring upward when alkaline and fresh-water springs mix and mingle and make for some satisfying selfies. On the western side of the 395, you’ll find the Sierra Nevada

mountain range which divides this great state like a butchers cleaver and to the east, Death Valley and the Mojave desert weigh in with their majestic landscapes in stark comparison. No matter what parks you visit in this vicinity, you’ll be greeted by great riding and scenic views for miles and miles.

Providence Mountains SRA ?2017, California State Parks. Photo by Brian Baer

Mono Lake Tufa State Reserve ? 2018, California State Parks. Photo by Brian Baer

Providence Mountains SRA ?2017, California State Parks. Photo by Brian Baer

Visit Bodie State Historic Park

Visit Yosemite National Park

Visit Mono County Hot Springs

Directions from Ridgecrest, California to Bridgeport, California.

Those are just a few of the Parks we pay for as taxpayers living in the great state of California and most of these can be enjoyed rather cheaply or even free. Do your research before visiting as some parks are seasonal or have limited capacity but as is often times the case, some parks are surrounded by BLM land that doesn’t require reservations and never really reaches capacity (albeit most of these areas don’t have a ton of amenities). The Mammoth Lakes area is one such spot that always has room to squeeze in the intrepid two-wheeled traveler and because of this fact, it’s one of my personal favorites to visit. That’s it for this episode of ‘Otto’s Gold’ and I wish to remind you that all bikes are adventure bikes if you take them on adventures. Party on, friends

Written by: Mike ‘Otto’ Deutsch. Follow him on Instagram!

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Spotlight: Girl on a Moto http://www.qosb.cn/spotlight-girl-on-a-moto/ Fri, 15 May 2020 00:25:15 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=44438 Written By: Johnny Killmore? Photos: @rambleonjesse Motorcycling is unique because it is at the same time an individual and shared activity. Even when we ride alone we tend to congregate at the same watering holes or rallies. We can ride alone but still have shared experiences of that perfect road, or that bitterly cold rainstorm […]

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Written By: Johnny Killmore? Photos: @rambleonjesse

Motorcycling is unique because it is at the same time an individual and shared activity. Even when we ride alone we tend to congregate at the same watering holes or rallies. We can ride alone but still have shared experiences of that perfect road, or that bitterly cold rainstorm we rode through once, or that time we broke down in the middle of nowhere.

Yet it can still be difficult to find like-minded riders. And while the internet has changed that quite a bit, we still need to find online places to congregate. Podcasts are one great way to do that, and the Girl on a Moto Podcast is one of those virtual places where you can share in the moto-banter. What sets this podcast apart from others seems to be that it is people-centric: it talks to the people who love motorcycles and digs into the how and why of their life and love of the two-wheeled world.

Connie and Beulah make a good pairing for the show, their dynamic being largely responsible for the show’s success. As women in the world of motorcycling they noticed it was hard to find people to connect with, and the idea of having a podcast where people could come together and learn more about what’s happening in the moto world made sense.

Connie [center] and Beulah [left] interviewing Jenna Stellar [right] of Stellar Moto Brand.

By pure luck I was able to corner these two busy gals on International Women’s Day for a quick chat. We got to talk about motorcycles of course, but I wanted to really know why it was so much of a passion that Connie and Beulah would put in the effort to do a podcast.

When asked about how they first got introduced to motorcycling, Beulah remembers old photos of her parents:

“Back in the 70’s [my parents] were bikers. My dad was sitting on his Indian when he kissed my mother at their wedding. I didn’t grow up in motorcycle culture, but I do remember those moments, and living in Southern California and seeing events like Born Free… seeing all these chopper dudes and it brough back memories.”

Connie also credits her parents for the first spark that made her think about motorcycles:

“I have this early memory of my dad getting pissed off and starting up his bike—he had this old Sportster that was a kick start—and taking off out of our driveway like a bat outta hell and me thinking, ‘man he looks cool.’ [laughs]. And really that’s probably the worst thing you can do at that moment, but yeah, I thought my dad was really rad. And it never was a thing, to be on the back. That was never an idea. It was more like, ‘okay, I’m gonna get mine, one day.’”

We can enjoy motorcycles by simply thumbing the starter button and pointing the front wheel to the end of the driveway, so where are these women finding the passion to create an online destination for thousands of other riders to listen to and talk about the motorcycling scene? Beulah had a good point about creating a place for riders to meet, which helped her find a scene that she clicked with:

“I had friends that rode, but when I first started off I didn’t ride with anyone. At first it was just me teaching myself how to ride, and taking little trips on my own. It wasn’t until five or six months before I really rode with anyone else. At that time I was married, and I couldn’t just go off with a bunch of dudes so it was really important for me to meet women who rode motorcycles, so I was very lucky that the first year I got a motorcycle was the first year of Babes Ride Out […] It was only about 50 women and I didn’t really know what I was showing up to, but it was a small enough group of people, and we were all kinda there for the same reason, and my network grew from there, and the feeling I got from there—just how welcoming everyone was—is what I try to extend now to new people that I meet.”

Beulah Mae.

And so out of this shared idea of helping riders get together came the Girl On A Moto podcast. Although Girl On A Moto is by women and for women, Connie and Beulah are crafty enough to make sure their podcast is aimed at a more general audience. After all, the bulk of what attracts people to motorcycles, regardless of gender, is the places they take us and the feeling they give us. That means the podcast is focused on telling the story of people who ride: why they ride, where they ride, and what they think of motorcycling culture as a whole.

I wondered why Connie and Beulah chose a podcast over a blog or Youtube channel (either a vlog style or an actual show). While it’s true podcasts take less editing than video, it’s still a ton of work if you want to have regular episodes, especially considering both Connie and Beulah hold down day jobs and have kids to raise. Connie reflected for a moment and said the podcast format seemed like a natural fit. In her own words:

“When I first started riding I found a podcast called ‘Riders on the Norm’ and I enjoyed the content, definitely, but they didn’t really touch on (obviously) women’s issues, since they weren’t women. But I liked how… I drive a lot for work, and I don’t have a lot of patience. […] So it was easier [with podcasts] to just hit play and hear a cool story. It’s also less intimidating because you don’t have to worry about things like what you look like. That made [a podcast] an easy outlet that wasn’t going to censor what I had to say.”

Connie DiBartola

Episodes of Girl On A Moto avoid super-techy conversations that can make a lot of people’s eyes glaze over, instead focusing on the people themselves and what they’re up to in the world of motorcycles. Episodes talk to people like Jenna Stellar of Stellar Moto Brand and James Baker of Bikers for Autism. They even interview other people doing their own podcasts like Phil Waters and Johnny Mac from the Cleveland Motorcycle Podcast.

One thing that has really helped create that “hanging out with your friends” vibe is investing in portable audio equipment. This way you can go right to someone’s shop and interview them at a place they’re familiar with, or if you meet someone at a rally you can find a quiet corner and do a quick interview on-the-spot. The difference in how their episodes feel to the listener is greatly improved. Beulah explains:

“When we first started this podcast, we were recording in a studio so you had to make sure the studio time was free, that our guests had time to come to the studio, that Connie and I were both free to come into the

studio. It was a lot of work putting that together. Then we ended up investing in our own gear.

“I listen to podcasts too and one of my favorites is Ari Shaffir, the comedian. And I remember him doing a podcast live, just walking through Central Park, and he would totally tell you what his gear was, so I use the same Zoom H6 recorder that he has and it’s just a perfect fit, because we can record wherever we are. The equipment is so small I can fit it in a backpack […] so it opens up a lot of opportunities.”

Being able to record on-the-fly adds a casual feel to Girl On A Moto.

But despite appealing to a wide audience the overarching goal is still to give women riders a place to connect and ask questions. Starting an event or a riding club means you can only reach people in your area and moving a lot of pieces to keep things in motion.

A podcast can be listened to by anyone that streams or downloads it, making it available at home, at work, in the car, or even on the bike. This means women riders might catch any one of the thirty-six-and-counting episodes and can listen at their own pace. When asked about starting the Girl On A Moto Podcast, Connie had this to say:

“I wanted to give other female riders something that I wanted and didn’t have when I got into riding: a support group, a network, someone they could ask questions, and to inspire. One hundred percent I wanted to inspire other women to ride.”

There is a space between needing something and wanting something, called contentment. It seems to be in short supply and we are constantly chasing it: whether we notice or not. Sometimes, by sharing our story or listening to someone share their story, the gap between us and contentment narrows, and we can touch it without effort.

For many, listening to Connie and Beulah spend time shooting the breeze with their guests is a way to narrow that gap. Give them a listen and see if you are one of those people. The Girl On A Moto Podcast is available on Spotify, Lisbyn, SoundCloud, iTunes, or right on their website, www.girlonamoto.com.. Follow them on Instagram!

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Virtual Motorcycle Show Info http://www.qosb.cn/virtual-motorcycle-show-info/ Mon, 11 May 2020 20:14:43 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=44330 Welcome to the Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys Virtual “STAY AT HOME” Motorcycle Show! Given these difficult times and shows having no other choice but to cancel or postpone, we decided to create the next best thing, a virtual show. Join the fun and enter your bike for your chance to win and be awarded! ??Class […]

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Welcome to the Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys Virtual “STAY AT HOME” Motorcycle Show! Given these difficult times and shows having no other choice but to cancel or postpone, we decided to create the next best thing, a virtual show. Join the fun and enter your bike for your chance to win and be awarded!

??Class Categories ??

Best Vintage – $200
Best Sport – $200
Best Stunt – $200
Best Chopper – $200
Best Cruiser – $200
Best Custom – $200
Daily Rider – $200
Pros & Partners – RBMA Prize Belt
Award for: Best In Show – $300

??ENTER??

Please submit your completed Entry Form & 4 Motorcycle Photos (all 4 sides of your bike) to: contests@www.qosb.cn. Submission deadline is midnight, June 12th.

??Voting??

Voting opens June 15th and is restricted to one vote per device.Voters can vote once a day everyday until midnight on June 19th. Voting takes place here.

??Awards??

Winners will be announced June 21st on Instagram LIVE (@rusbrownmotorcycleattorneys) and will featured in Quick Throttle Magazine. Each class will receive a winner for Best of Class and will be awarded! Voting will be people’s choice via website votes. So post and share your entry as much as you’d like so your following knows to vote for you!

??Contest Rules??

Virtual Motorcycle Contest Rules

* Disclaimer: This contest is not endorsed by Instagram *

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Hawg Supply: “The Chun” Breathes New Life http://www.qosb.cn/hawg-supply-the-chun-breathes-new-life/ Mon, 04 May 2020 19:10:49 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=44032 Article by Becky Goebel @actuallyitsaxel The Chun – a staple in the Los Angeles motorcycle community. Tucked into the side of the downtown high-rises, The 3,000 square ft space is full of memories from every biker who ever attended a Born Free pre-party, an under-ground biker band album launch or a memorial for one of […]

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Article by Becky Goebel @actuallyitsaxel

The Chun – a staple in the Los Angeles motorcycle community. Tucked into the side of the downtown high-rises, The 3,000 square ft space is full of memories from every biker who ever attended a Born Free pre-party, an under-ground biker band album launch or a memorial for one of our fellow fallen riders. The Chun has housed many chopper builds, many bikes, and many bikers themselves.

The Chun sits just on the edge of Downtown Los Angeles.

The iconic stage area at The Chun – Photo by @thechunstudio

In 2012 the space was acquired by Ryan Grossman, Davey Cooperwasser and Snake. It was just a huge open warehouse. The space has since been built up by the array of tenants and friends who have used it and who created a hangout space, a kitchen, a cyc photography wall, a fully-functioning bathroom, a stage and of course, stripper poles. In the past 8 years, the Chun has been used in music videos, movie sets, celebrity photo shoots and? some iconic rager biker parties. Want to see for yourself? Check out this YouTube video from the night The Picturebooks played on their stage:

Snakes bike in the Chun during his reign as Chun King.
The Chun when they first started building some walls:

Throughout the years, there were many bikers and builders that came and went at the Chun. Snake stayed for the entire 8 years but others came and went, renting spaces to work on their bikes then moving along. As of 2020, it was just Snake and photographer/biker Todd Blubaugh renting the space and had been for quite some time.

Recently, the day came when they were ready to move on. These two were the backbone to the last couple years of the Chun, the reason why a lot of us in the chopper/custom community know each other and a lot of the reason this community

even exists. Watching them move out of the space they literally built with their own two hands was sad, but it was time for them to move on.

Cody Kemmet moved to Los Angeles from Bismarck, North Dakota a little over a year ago. He is famously known for popping wheelies on long front-end choppers and tearing apart a kiddy pool at Born Free with the back tire of his People’s Champ build. Cody is a killer mechanic who specializes in Shovelheads, Panheads and anything old Harley Davidson. His shop, Hawg Supply was stationed at a warehouse in Santa Ana for not even a year when he got the call from Snake that the Chun was up for grabs.

Cody Kemmet of Hawg Supply

While shooting photos at the Chun for this article, I asked Cody about his first time ever coming there was. This was the story that ensued:

“Me and my two buddies were going to ride to Born Free 7 from New Mexico. None of us had ever even been to LA. We stopped in Phoenix to try to wait out the heat and didn’t end up leaving until 10pm. My bike kept breaking down and I realized I had a motor issue and couldn’t ride. This one-legged dude in a 90s Chevy Silverado picked me and my bike up and drove me all the way to Palm Springs. When we got there, I charged my dead phone battery at a Wendys and got a voicemail that my 2 other buddies had actually got hit on their way to meet me… all the way back in Arizona. I made an Instagram post needing help and this dude got his wife to come pick me up from this Wendys in Palm Springs. I was all dirty and I’m pretty sure she was scared of me at first. She ended up taking me all the way back to Arizona to get my other two buddies and their bikes. She then took us to her house in San Clemente where we stayed for 5 days fixing our bikes before Born Free. Super crazy, I still talk to those people at shows to this day. When our bikes were finally fixed, it was Friday and we had heard about a Born Free pre-party in LA. We had never even been to LA before, so we rode up there to check it out. There was bands playing, tons of people there and tons of cool choppers lined up down the street. It was an awesome space and awesome party. Right when we got there, I met a weird dude who introduced himself as ‘Snake’ who got us into the party. That was my first ever experience of the Chun!”

Cody and Lee at the Chun, both of their first times in LA

Fast forward a couple months of heavy lifting, a couple zillion beers and a couple melt downs, Snake and Todd were cleaned up and Cody was moved in. Of course the signature pieces of The Chun remained: The matching stripper poles, the ginormous American Flag, the “Chun” painted garage door and the Moose head watching over the entrance of the shop.

Yes, that’s a Panhead margarita machine.

For being just 25 years old, Cody has seen his fair share of bikes, parties and highways. He was the other half of the Vitzy Boys parts dealer brand until his move to California and has had his hands on many builds that you all have seen in ads, shoots or at shows. Cody is a staple in the chopper scene. The move to the Chun was a no brainer, not only for Cody but for Snake and Todd and the rest of the chopper community.

To take over such an iconic space, especially in Los Angeles, is a big deal. Cody doesn’t seem to have a ton of time to worry about that though – the second he started unpacking at his new space he had customers needing his attention. If you need Cody, you gotta find him. But people sure seem to figure it out. The Chun is not an open-to-the-public kind of place. It doesn’t have a store front and it doesn’t have a sign. You need to know Cody’s Instagram, website or phone number to get in contact with him and it works good for the 1-man-show that is Hawg Supply.

What’s it like to take over the Chun?

“It’s cool to be able to keep the history of this place place alive”

Although Los Angeles is globally recognized as a custom motorcycle hub considering we have year-long summers – the city doesn’t boast a ton of custom shops that know their shit. As someone who often needs repairs in the LA area, I find we often end up at a Harley dealership or going outside the city to garages that are more affordable for the average custom motorcycle enthusiast. LA is expensive in regards to everything, so to have Hawg Supply right in the heart of everything, is a treat for us all.

What is Hawg Supply and what do you do?

“Hawg Supply is a business I run so I don’t have to work a real job. I work on old bikes, engines and transmissions. I also make parts and build choppers from the ground up.”

Moving forward, the Chun is sure to come alive once again. Like it did in its glory days, the space will be full of motorcycle conversation, biker BBQs, chopper building and the people that make this community what it is.

The Hawg Supply shop/The Chun is open to repairs, custom part fabrication, bike construction, motor re-builds and more – as long as it’s stamped Harley Davidson. The space is also available for rent for location shoots. It’s exciting to think about the cool things that are going to roll out of the shop throughout the next couple years so stay tuned!

You can get in touch with Cody through his site: www.hawgsupply.com or his instagram @hawg_supply.

If you want to see a bit more history from The Chun, check out their old studio page on Instagram: @thechunstudio.

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