Russ Brown http://www.qosb.cn Thu, 08 Oct 2020 20:36:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.4 http://www.qosb.cn/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/favicon.png Russ Brown http://www.qosb.cn 32 32 Cole Freeman http://www.qosb.cn/cole-freeman/ Fri, 09 Oct 2020 15:30:21 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=46030 Cole Freeman getting some crazy air on his Evel Knievel-style jump.

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Cole Freeman getting some crazy air on his Evel Knievel-style jump.

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Anya Violet: from Enthusiast to Entrepreneur http://www.qosb.cn/anya-violet-from-enthusiast-to-entrepreneur/ Mon, 05 Oct 2020 21:39:21 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45894 So Anya, tell us about your home life or day in the life: WHAT DO YOU DO ON THAT MOUNTAIN!? Well, I live in the mountains about 1.5 hours outside of LA. It’s not far but it feels like a world away. I am lucky enough to get to work from home so my days […]

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So Anya, tell us about your home life or day in the life: WHAT DO YOU DO ON THAT MOUNTAIN!?

Well, I live in the mountains about 1.5 hours outside of LA. It’s not far but it feels like a world away. I am lucky enough to get to work from home so my days during the week are spent in my home office running the “behind the scenes” of Babes Ride Out, Babes in the Dirt, and Atwyld. Each day is different as I toggle between, but the majority is spent at my desk on the phone. All things Babes Ride Out/Babes in the Dirt consist of emails, updating the website and social channels, interviews for our blog, working with our partners, and long calls with my BFF and co-founder Ashmore Ellis. My duties for Atwyld change wildly throughout the day from accounting to art direction for a photoshoot to technical product design to packing orders. I do it all and so do my co-founders Corinne and Jaime. ?I like to start and end each day by walking my dog through my neighborhood or in the forest. In the evening when my life partner Evan gets home from work we like to eat dinner together out on the deck and unwind.? Weekends have been spent on my dirt bike a lot which I am so grateful for. Running two businesses does not normally allow you much downtime or free weekends so quarantine life has meant lots of dirt bike life for me. I can ride right out of my driveaway to a bunch of awesome trails. Life is good in the mountains.

Riding history: break it down for us/ how did you start, have you taken any continued education classes?

I first started riding a 1980-something 50cc dirt bike when I was 7 years old. I was the only one out of my two other sisters that really fell in love with riding motorcycles. Both my parents had bikes at different points in their life so I guess it was kind of meant to be. My mom and I rode dirt bikes all throughout my childhood, riding trails and racing motocross all over the central coast of California. I gradually upgraded from a 50cc to an 80cc to a 125cc bike before I ended up taking a break from riding during my late high school and college years. It is not easy to afford a motorcycle when you’re going through college or starting a career, so I didn’t get a bike again until my early 20’s. Dirt bikes progressed to street bikes pretty quickly and riding became a central part of my life again. Since then I have had some pretty epic times on a motorcycle! I have trained in Supermoto and advanced rider training. I have ridden a motorcycle through the Sahara Desert in Morocco and on the black sand beaches in Bali. Some of the best times in my life have been on a motorcycle!

What bikes do you have in the garage currently? Any names or significant history associated with them?
  • 2020 Husqvarna FE 350s Dualsport bike is the one that gets the most action.
  • 1977 Yamaha DT 400 I have raced this bike many times in the local vintage race series. He kicks over every time!
  • 1991 Harley Sportster that my Uncle Kris gifted me when he found out I got my M1.
Photo by Drew Martin
Tell us about the type of rider you are / what you love about riding street & dirt:

I am the type of rider that is mostly in it for the thrills and how clear and quiet my mind gets when I ride. I love to push myself and try new things and work on my skills. When it comes to dirt bikes, I love to be able to get way out in the wilderness and enjoy the views but I like a bit of a challenge on the way there. The technical single track is my favorite as long as it mixed with some fast and flowy trails. Riding on the street can be insanely fun and thrilling for me, especially on these fun mountain roads. After a really severe accident that I was in 2 years ago, street riding has become less interesting and less enticing to me. That may change over time but for now, I like to stick to the remote backroads.

Photo by Mike Pham for Atwyld
You most embarrassing moment on the street and dirt, SPILL IT, SISTER!

HAHAHA, I am laughing just thinking about it. The only person that saw was Ashmore and I am sure she is laughing as she reads this too. We had just finished with being extras in a? video shoot that really neither of us were that stoked to be involved in but we were helping out a friend. We were headed home and ended up getting lost. I was mentally exhausted at this point already so I hopped off my bike so I could set up my maps to give us turn by turn directions. I ended up having no service, so I started to get frustrated and when I went to get back on my bike I tipped over. I was so annoyed at this point and once we popped it back upright it just tipped over the other way. Yes, I tick tocked my motorcycle. It was stupid to be that frustrated but luckily no damage was done. The moral of the story is: don’t ride your motorcycle when you are in an irritated mood. That’s when you end up doing dumb stuff.

Can you recall a favorite moment from a street or dirt trip?

My favorite moment on a motorcycle of all time happened earlier this year. I was on a weeklong off-road adventure in Morocco and we were ripping through the sand dunes. We turned to face the largest dune at 400+ feet tall. As you climb, you want to let off the gas just before you reach the peak of the dune so that you don’t launch over. You want to just get your front tire over the peak so that you balance on top of the massive dune. The feeling was one of the most thrilling things I have ever experienced and the view out over the sea of dunes was incredible. The visual is burned into my memory forever.

Photo by Jenny Linquist
Can you recall a moment that is/was funny from riding street or dirt?

You know what’s funny is when 50 awesome women signed up to meet a bunch of strangers to ride motorcycles to an undisclosed location in the California desert. ( Babes in Borrego/our first event)? haha, That is truly hilarious to me because I honestly wonder if someone presented me with that idea today if I would say yes or no haha.

What motivates you to grow/produce the events on street and dirt?

There are so many things that motivate me to grow Babes Ride Out and Babes in the Dirt. I see so much joy come from women getting to experience motorcycling. I get so much energy and fulfillment from helping to bring like-minded people together. When I really dig deep and think hard about what is at the crux of that motivation, it is female empowerment. Shocking, I know.? I grew up idolizing so many male figures in my life; movie characters, musicians, and friends. It just always seemed to me like all the fun stuff that I was in to was geared toward dudes. All the great adventure stories are about dudes. All the major athletes and sports figures are dudes. Boy scouts seemed so fun to me as a kid but it was for boys. I really was not exposed to a lot of female idols to look up to that were “doing things” that resonated with me. They were out there, but their stories were not amplified in the same way. I am now surrounded by the raddest bunch of female artists, entrepreneurs, makers, musicians, adventurers, motorcycle riders, bosses, and leaders. I don’t know what it is about riding motorcycles, but it certainly brings together some insanely admirable people and I really like that I get to play a small role in amplifying that and bringing them together.

Photo by Genevieve Davis
How do you measure personal success?

Personal success to me is measured by how much time I am able to dedicate to myself and the things that I personally want to do. So much time needs to be spent on trying to survive and keep up with life. Whether it is working to make money or maintain your household or whatever adult stuff you have to do. I feel most successful when I am comfortable enough to unplug and do what Anya wants to do without having to answer to anyone. I think someday that “me” time will be greater than the “working to survive” time and that is when I will feel most successful.

Photo by Michael Beck
What can you not live without besides me?

I cannot live without feeling part of a team. That is just the kind of creature that I am. My partner Evan is such a crucial teammate as well as my family and close friendships. I think that if I lost everything and I still had my core team I could live through anything.

What makes you the happiest besides (2) wheels?

Having no agenda, no one to answer to, no one that needs anything from me and just being able to do whatever I want with my days. True freedom. I feel that the most when I am camping way out of cell phone service with just me and Evan and my dog. Being in nature makes me feel the most comfortable being human.

Photo by Colin Nearman for 805 Beer

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Santa Cruz, DGR: Just the Beginning! http://www.qosb.cn/santa-cruz-dgr/ Thu, 01 Oct 2020 21:00:27 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45977 I am privileged and proud to have joined tens of thousands of riders across the globe to raise funds and awareness for prostate and testicular cancer research and men’s mental health and suicide prevention programs through the Movember Foundation. My first, of many to come, Distinguished Gentlemen’s Ride. Distinguished Gentlemen’s Ride – September 27th, 2020 […]

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I am privileged and proud to have joined tens of thousands of riders across the globe to raise funds and awareness for prostate and testicular cancer research and men’s mental health and suicide prevention programs through the Movember Foundation. My first, of many to come, Distinguished Gentlemen’s Ride.

Distinguished Gentlemen’s Ride – September 27th, 2020

Santa Cruz Ride with Bex and Buddies

Ride Solo Together Poster- 2020 DGR
Launch: Sea to Skyline

Skies clear, sunny, yet a crisp morning. I had dusted off my distinguished duds, tuned my steed, to ride with others across the globe for men’s health in the 2020 Distinguished Gentlemen’s Ride.

Fueled and caffeinated, a few fabulous friends and I share some exciting words about the DGR mission: combining motorbikes, and men’s cancer prevention and health awareness-how rad! Stoked to ride our two-wheeled loves for a great cause, we threw our stylish legs over and launched from a café in Scotts Valley, a moto-hub mountain town of Santa Cruz County.

Santa Cruz, California, 2020 Distinguished Gentlemen’s Ride participants, riding Solo Together, respecting Covid19 modifications to this unprecedented year’s DGR

Bikers: A Kind, Caring Community

Leila leads us on a cool cruise down a mountain, on a narrow, often one-lane road, following a redwood forest streambed. We shot out under a tunnel and into downtown. Our SC DGR crew saw some buddies and had an impromptu gathering at the Santa Cruz Courthouse.

A perfect stop for many reasons, but most unique was how the Universe reunited the beanie baby I rescued from the intersection with the little boy who lost it. His grateful father took photos so we all were included.

Sharing (and caring) our men’s health mission, this father visiting from Brittan, was so moved he photo us for his album!

…small acts of kindness and caring communication make large ripples of good in our community and beyond…

Santa Cruz, County Courthouse, a planned stop with unexpected friends, opportunity to share the DGR mission, and even a heartfelt reunion

A Roundabout the Boardwalk: Santa Cruz Landmark

Santa Cruz and Boardwalk are like Paris and Eiffel Tower. Can’t go to one and not see the other. Our classy crew, new supporters in tow, navigated about the tourists to indulge in smells of cotton candy, views of rollercoasters, and sounds of little and big humans’ laughter.

Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk rides, arcades, and miniature golf are canceled, due to Covid19, but the virus hasn’t taken away the joys of breathtaking views, beach volleyball, sand sculptures, the Wharf, surf spots, sea lions, ocean-front dining, carnival food, and the Boardwalk itself

Pacific Coast Highway: A Couldn’t Be Better Day

We headed north, out of Santa Cruz, up the PCH, wishing our surprise riding buddies awesome asphalt adventures as they headed south. Ladies in lead, Leila, Julio, Keith, and I opened our throttles, sang the song of the wind, as the salt of the sea kissed our skin.

Saying hello to Pigeon Point Lighthouse SP ranger, we shared our mission requesting a photo. Being a two-time breast cancer survivor, she celebrated Movember and the DGR, happily obliging with this photo


Alice’s Restaurant: Gearhead Icon

Before our late lunch, Julio and I enjoyed many miles of breathtaking seaside views before we dipped into the Santa Cruz mountains to dance along perfectly banked sweepers winding us up to Skyline. To add to the jubilant jaunt, our Russ Brown buddies were enjoying the delicious day at Alice’s too! With their Riders Helping Riders program they are experts at Riding Solo Together.

As the song should say, “you can see anything you want at Alice’s Restaurant”. Sure you can get good eats at Alice’s, but it’s the machines parked at Skyline Blvd and La Honda Rd. that make me, and numerous others, salivate.

Alice’s Restaurant, La Honda, CA., a destination point for every motorhead, a phenomenal ride for all.

Painting from Alice’s Facebook
Return: Skyline to Sea

Rides and riders refueled, we added one more unexpected rider to our DGR adventure, a friend to our community, Luis, a local rep for Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys. The three of us raced the sun down the Santa Cruz Mountains to the Pacific Ocean many twists and turns below.

Sempervirens Point, Highway 9, Boulder Creek, CA offers breathtaking views of the Santa Cruz Mountains, Pacific Ocean to Monterey (on a smoke-free day)

If you take time to ‘smell the roses’ you’ll find all sorts of beautiful wisdom along life’s ride, this one is on Hwy 9


Santa Cruz, DGR: Making a difference and doing dapper on steel horses!

It has been said many times, and should many more, that the riding community is the best!

Although we only had days, we raised over $1000 to help the Movember Foundation fight for men’s health and wellness.

As if that wasn’t awesome enough, we then dressed in our most dapper digs, and rode our motorcycles in the city, aside from the sea, and through the mountains sharing the DGR mission, building awareness, and making friends along the way.

A doodle on the DGR map, of our moto bebop about the Santa Cruz area

I can’t wait for next year!

Licking dried salt off my smiling lips,

perfectly complimented the sweetest of days!

Be kind,

Bex

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Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride http://www.qosb.cn/distinguished-gentlemans-ride/ Fri, 25 Sep 2020 15:46:29 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45961 This year is a strange year for the Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride as we’ve moved from our traditional gathering to a solo ride event across the world. Though we are separated from one another, we are committed to doing our part as a community by standing together amidst these social hardships. On Sunday, September 27th, 2020 […]

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This year is a strange year for the Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride as we’ve moved from our traditional gathering to a solo ride event across the world. Though we are separated from one another, we are committed to doing our part as a community by standing together amidst these social hardships. On Sunday, September 27th, 2020 many will ride their own ride but I am confident there will be small clusters of friends who will come together for their own rides. That’s what the LA team is doing this Sunday.?

I began organizing and operating the Los Angeles Distinguished Gentlemans Ride 5 years ago at the behest of DGR Founder, Mark Hawwa and since taking over, me and my team, alongside the Venice Vintage Motorcycle Club have sought to elevate the conversation around men’s mental health, prostate cancer research, and suicide prevention while putting on a world-class event in one of the organizations top cities.?

The Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride means so much to its many participants but at its core, I believe empathy and community are the foundations of this great event and cause. Many of us are tied to it for personal reasons. For me, it’s always been the relationship between my father and me. Not only did my Pappy introduce me to motorcycles when I was younger, but he also fought and won his battle with prostate cancer before the DGR came into existence. Going through that with him as a young man served as a wake-up call for me to focus on my own health both physically and mentally. This confluence of life events including working within the motorcycle industry led me to my involvement in DGR.?

I firmly believe that the first step in dealing with mental health is acknowledging we are individually flawed. Very few if any of us all have this life figured out. We all struggle with particular aspects of our lives. Some of us struggle more whereas some may struggle less. It then lies on the collective whole and sometimes just a set of concerned individuals to create that positive change. By opening lines of communication and asking for help or rendering help, we can greatly influence the lives of those around us. I owe this way thinking to both of my parents who instilled in me an ever-present need to reflect, modify, adapt, and grow.

As city host for Los Angeles, I have tried to put myself in a position to be there for any registered rider or anyone who wishes to talk through their problems. There are some topics I’m keen to help find solutions to but there are certainly matters outside of my skill set. In times like these, I will always do what I can to help those receive the help they need. This level of care and selflessness doesn’t begin and end with me but has been displayed by my core team who have helped make the LA ride one of the top rides in the world. We believe in helping one another by solidifying this awesome community and tackling these issues head on. As cliche as it sounds, at the end of the day, we’re in this together.?

2020 has been a difficult year for many and it’s not without a shortage of mental health stressors. I wish we could have our ride this year in the traditional sense because that gathering and camaraderie is needed now more than ever but on the flip side, I understand and respect the need to curb a widespread pathogen.

As the city host for Los Angeles, I encourage all participants and riders who support the DGR to find a little time on September 27th to ride your own ride. Find a couple of members from previous years, maintain social distancing, and relish the camaraderie the DGR affords us but just on a smaller scale. 2020 will come and go but our sense of community will remain. After we move on from the pandemic, we’ll all ride as one again and celebrate this wonderful cause.

Photo Gallery of 2019 DGR – HERE

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Caught On Camera: The story of Chain Arunritthirot http://www.qosb.cn/caught-on-camera-the-story-of-chain-arunritthirot/ Wed, 23 Sep 2020 20:43:41 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45936 If you’ve been on the internet at all this summer, then you’ve most likely seen this wild video. It leaves you with so many questions as you watch the 1:21 second clip, first of all, HOW and second of all where the heck is the rider…well the owner of the motorcycle is 37-year-old Chain Arunritthirot […]

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If you’ve been on the internet at all this summer, then you’ve most likely seen this wild video. It leaves you with so many questions as you watch the 1:21 second clip, first of all, HOW and second of all where the heck is the rider…well the owner of the motorcycle is 37-year-old Chain Arunritthirot and I caught up with him to find out, first hand, what in the world actually happen.

Friday, June 19, the day of the accident Chain left work early and hopped on his Honda CBR to start his ride home. He got on the 91 freeway in Corona heading east and noticed it was pretty jammed up with standstill traffic at the 15 junctions, so he decided he would safely cross over a few lanes and take the streets home instead. He was in his own lane just passing semi-trucks on each side of him, when the next thing he knew, he was thrown from his bike and tumbling down the freeway.? He says it felt like he was thrown 120 yards down a football field, miraculously without getting hit. Can you imagine?!

 

 

Thankfully he was geared up from head to toe, but even so, going about 60 mph and getting rammed by a minivan must have been scary as all hell! Chain was conscious during the entire incident and stated that he never really felt an ‘impact,’ rather, all of a sudden he was just simply no longer on his bike. As his body began to come to a stop, his mind began to race, what was his next move? He mustered up his strength, looked up, and somehow saw no oncoming traffic, luckily many people on the freeway had slowed down, stopped, and a couple even jumped out of their vehicle to help pull him over to the shoulder. What came next had everyone completely stumped…here was this motorcyclist that had just been bucked off his bike, sliding down the freeway, miraculously still in one piece, yet there was no bike to be found. While people were checking up on Chain, more and more pulled over to see if they could help, then he overheard someone mentioned that his bike was down the road stuck to a minivan!

The mangled bike was located off the freeway, on the side of the road, not too far from the abandoned minivan that had been crashed into a fence. The driver, 25-year-old George Valentin, fled the scene and was caught the following day trying to report the van stolen but later admitting he was behind the wheel, he has been charged with a Felony Hit and Run. There aren’t too many more details, as this is still an open case. Chain, did mention that he spoke to George and has made his peace with him.

Chain, hasn’t ridden since the accident, but we spoke about what the next steps were for him, as far as riding, and he said he won’t be changing how he rides, but how much he rides. He’s still processing the incident, and understandably so! As for the CBR, it’s still toast, but he was able to get it back! Unfortunately, a few parts from the bike have gone ‘missing’ since its visit to the tow yard and it is unlikely he will be receiving enough insurance money to get it roadworthy, so he plans on making it a track bike.

If you’d like to learn more about Chain, how he’s doing, and what his bike is up to, you can follow him @_Chain_909_ or subscribe to his youtube channel.

Interview and blog by Adri Law.

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A Summer Roll to the Hottest Place on Earth http://www.qosb.cn/a-summer-roll-to-the-hottest-place-on-earth/ Sat, 19 Sep 2020 00:06:15 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45899 I never check the weather in the summer before a ride in California because it’s like – it’s not going to rain or snow down here so we’re good! Right? Wrong. I live on the ocean in LA so the temperatures are pretty low compared to the rest of the state, even during a heatwave. […]

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I never check the weather in the summer before a ride in California because it’s like – it’s not going to rain or snow down here so we’re good! Right? Wrong. I live on the ocean in LA so the temperatures are pretty low compared to the rest of the state, even during a heatwave. When Al from Sick Sycles SoCal Choppers hit me up about riding inland to Kernville, I didn’t blink an eye. Little did I know, we were about to melt 3 days away.

Let’s Go – Nick and his Evo chopper

Cody from Hawg Supply had been rebuilding the transmission in my FXR for the past couple weeks and had just finished up in time for us to leave. He spent so much time on my bike that he wasn’t able to get his Panhead tuned up in time to take it on the trip. I said he could just take the FXR and asked EagleRider if they’d lend me a bike for a couple of days. Sure enough, they hooked me up with a 2020 Harley Davidson Heritage.

The EagleRider Heritage parked outside at Hawg Supply in Downtown LA

Friday morning, the crew started showing up at the Codys shop. We had Adri Law there, Sade from the band LA Witch, Joey Kerivan who built a bike for Born Free last year, and Tyler Wheeland, who has one of the coolest survivor Panheads in LA. Our buddy Nick created a route for us to avoid the major highways. Even though we left at 10 am, the sun was already insanely hot.

Lined up near Downtown LA, ready to go.

We took the Angeles Crest Highway up through the mountains and into Palmdale. Coming down the mountain into the Desert Valley was like riding into a hair blowdryer. It was insanely hot. I think it was the hottest temperatures I have ever ridden in. Al and his crew left from Redlands. We were planning on meeting up with them on the 395 highway but because their route was 111℉ they decided to just hammer through the day and meet up at the river in Kern.

Our route from LA to Kern River

Since we didn’t have to go way over to the 395 HWY, we decided to go through Tehachapi and ride through the wind mills. It was still over 100℉ and every little cloud that went over the sun was a relief. Even though the heat was extreme, the roads were amazing. I actually had ridden part of this route years ago on a Moto trip from Canada and had been wondering where these roads were for years after. Sometimes it’s nice to let someone else lead a ride and let them take you on an adventure. That’s what this whole day felt like to me.

Riding through the windmills in Tehachapi
Nick leading the way through the desert hills of Tehachapi

Our 3-hour ride turned into a 10-hour ride which was totally fine with me. The small roads were cool and at every gas station, we found a spigot to soak ourselves and our clothes in. I bought 8 big water bottles that day. At one gas station, Adri and I ignored an “Employees Only” sign that leads us into the store’s cooler storage. We spent a solid 15 minutes in there cooling off.

Tyler cooling down at a gas station

Although I was jealous of the boys’ choppers, it was nice to have a comfortable and reliable bike through the hot spots of this trip. Breaking down in this heat would be super dangerous and I’m glad we didn’t have to deal with that at all on this trip!

My Heritage at a Kernville gas station

When we got to Kern River, we found Al and his crew. There were tons of rad bikes in the campground, a burger shack, a rope swing into the river, and even a bar full of beers! It was a perfect spot to spend the weekend.

Al on his chopper at the campsite
More campsite
Todds Bike at the the campsite

Our friend Ryan just had a birthday and cruised down from Northern California to celebrate for the weekend. He scooped up the Infamous Tom Fugle Chopper “One Love” a while back and had it at the campsite. It was pretty cool to see that thing in real life and even cooler to see Ryan riding it and keeping it alive. Ryan doesn’t just ride the thing, he pops wheelies on it down the road and crushes at 100mph all day.

Ryans bike

We spent the next 2 days riding around Kern. Al had a whole bunch of activities planned for us – hiking, group rides, and even river floating. That’s right, there were 25 of us dirty biker kids floating down Kern River in dollar store Floaters. It was hilarious. Cody and I took the Heritage for a rip one evening after the heat cooled down. He hadn’t ridden the new Harley line yet so it was fun to sit on the back and let him cruise through the Sequoias during sunset.

View from the backseat

On Sunday, it was time to clean up the campsite and cruise home. I shot a few more photos of the bikes that rode out and helped clean up about 10,000 beer cans. Those boys sure know how to party and thankfully they didn’t see where I hid my tent up in the trees or they’d come to haze me in the night.

Who’s pup!?
Martin’s Chop he rode from Redlands

Tylers Panhead

We didn’t take off until 6 pm on Sunday. The temps were over 110℉ during the day so we decided on a sunset/night cruise. We rode home a totally different route and stayed all together until we got to HWY 14. There was a little rainstorm in our distance and it was beautiful. There was a single rain cloud with a rainbow that came out the side all the way down to the desert. It looked like the boys were riding right towards it.

The storm!
Flipped my phone around – Me, Adri and then Cody on my FXR

We split away from the Redlands boys once we got to HWY 14. The 4 of us: Adri, Cody, Nick, and I rode into the evening heat through the Red Rock Canyon State Park and past the rainstorm that actually sprinkled on us for a minute or so. Nick had a leak in his gas tank so we spent some time on the side of the highway but the Summer night was nice.

Stuck on the side of the road with my Heritage

Our route home wasn’t as intricate as our ride to Kernville but it was pretty dang amazing. The night skies, the summer air after sunset, the little amount of traffic – everything was perfect. After a weekend of sun and riding it was an awesome ending.

When we got home, the news was claiming that Death Valley was the hottest place on earth this past weekend, reaching 131℉. We were less than 100 miles from there on our way home.

I took my Heritage back to EagleRider the next morning. Shout out to those guys for hooking it up! I had a really good experience at their store and with their bike. If you’re ever in need of a bike rental, try using EagleRider – they have tons of bikes to choose from dirt bikes, to fast bikes, to any type of Harley Davidson. Until next time guys! Stay cool!

The Los Angeles EagleRider

Becky Goebel @actuallyitsaxel

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From Highs to Lows With Some WTF Tossed In: Meet Ashmore Ellis of Babes Ride Out http://www.qosb.cn/from-highs-to-lows-with-some-wtf-tossed-in-meet-ashmore-ellis-of-babes-ride-out/ Tue, 15 Sep 2020 02:02:53 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45883 Let’s rewind a bit. Tell us about where you’re from, what your childhood was like. I grew up in a rural area called Bayou George which is in the panhandle of Florida, and yes, it’s as glamourous as it sounds. I typically tell people I am from Panama City FL, as 0 people have a […]

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Let’s rewind a bit. Tell us about where you’re from, what your childhood was like.

I grew up in a rural area called Bayou George which is in the panhandle of Florida, and yes, it’s as glamourous as it sounds. I typically tell people I am from Panama City FL, as 0 people have a clue about the Bayou’s whereabouts. Our pets consisted of anything stray that wandered up in our yard and our imaginations and our home on 4 acres was our sanctuary. I was always reading and excelled in creative writing which meant I was a super nerd. I had a lot of drive even as a child and realized, thanks to my mom, I had the power to be and become whatever I wanted as long as I worked hard and didn’t let a few failures stand in my way (shout out Robin). I watched my mom work her way from a manual laborer at the papermill and putting herself through college to become the CEO of a bank. I credit her for a lot of my “scrub the toilets if its what needs to be done” mentality. You can still find me picking up cigarette butts and trash at all Babes Ride Out / Babes in the Dirt events because of this (side note to those who litter, I am going to catch you one day).

Who did you idolize as a kid? Movie characters, musicians, actors?

We didn’t have cable or have the desire to watch movies growing up. I honestly don’t recall being excited about TV or things like that. My mom was a very outdoors person and we were lucky enough to have space to explore like kids. She encouraged us to get outside and stay outside which meant bumps, bruises, and many band-aids…sometimes stitches.

Tell us something people probably do not know about you. A fun fact if you will. Maybe it’s something that might surprise us.

My superhero strength is I can sleep anywhere or anytime. It’s a true gift that I am grateful for as an adult. I can literally lay on the cold cement floor and pass out, test me.

If you did not end up in the career that you are in now, what do you think you would have ended up doing?

Ooo! I love this question! In no particular order:? Immigration lawyer or Environmental lawyer (no one loves paperwork more than I do), dog walker (might still do this, stay tuned), vacation property management in Mammoth Lakes, CA (option for later), National Geographic expedition travel planner for the public (YES IT’S A REAL THING!), and finally, tour guide for kids at SpaceX (does that exist? If so, Elon, dial me!)

Ok, ok motorcycles. How did Motorcycling enter your life?

I’ll sum it up in two sentences so I don’t bore whoever is reading this: I was living in Encinitas, CA and some of my guy friends were getting bikes and I thought I’d give it a shot. I signed up for an MSF class and the rest is history.

Before you started riding, did you have any preconceived notions about motorcycles or the riding community?

I know it sounds crazy but not at all. The term “biker” was foreign to me and I never had any preconceived notions on what being a rider meant or should look like. I didn’t know a riding community existed when I got my license outside of the few people I saw scootin’ down the coast. To me, it was like buying a car and I wasn’t in a Subaru club or community so I didn’t give it a 2nd thought until my guy friends bailed on motorcycles and I was riding alone. I wanted to meet others to ride with and luckily, I met you (Anya!).

How has your love and passion for two wheels evolved over time and morphed into wherever it is today?

I’ve had to make it a priority now that I have an infant to take care of on top of managing my workload. Luckily, I have one hell of a husband, incredible friends, and the realization that it’s important for me to ride in order to be myself. Sometimes that’s street, sometimes its dirt. I’ll take what I can get these days and appreciate every single mile no matter the terrain.

What have riding motorcycles taught you about yourself?

On the harder rides, it’s taught me to suck it up and get through whatever current hell I am facing because there is never an option to give up or quit. You have to move forward and push through the discomfort. On the picture-perfect rides, it reminds me of how fortunate I am to be able to experience life like this.

Has becoming a mom shifted your perspective on motorcycling at all?

It hasn’t, however, before I had my daughter, I wasn’t sure how I would feel about motorcycling. As moms often do, we all have terrible thoughts of what could happen but I knew I needed to get back on my bike as soon as I healed to ease those nagging thoughts. Once I started the engine and put a few miles down, it was like I never left. It actually felt like coming home in a sense, a return to “me”. I have and always will be a cautious rider that knows my own limits and capabilities so you won’t find me grinding my footpegs around the side of a mountain (ever) but I do say a prayer for protection before I ride and a prayer of gratitude when I return to give thanks and recognition to the gravity of it all.

Give us your highest highs and lowest lows on two wheels.

Highs: Crossing the border in Mexico and flying down the desert on the El Diablo Run with friends. Nothing is like it & I can’t wait for EDR 2021. Literally going to any event or show to just hangout. I love it and appreciate everyone who puts in the endless hours of work to create a space for us to see old friends and make new ones within the two-wheel community. Lows: Coming out of the Tetons during the first snow of the year and freezing my ass off for hours. Corinne was with me and we both wanted to kill Mike (my husband) for no reason other than we blamed him for the absurd weather. Also, shooting an 805 thing for Babes Ride Out when it was 38 degrees while 2 months pregnant (no one knew but me) riding & manhandling a 550-pound bike all day while internally wanting to D I E from the morning sickness which I might add last ALL DAY, freezing cold literally, and lack of energy. BUT I DID IT!!! Shout out Troy and Collin for my maternity photos even though they didn’t know they were shooting them ??

What has running Babes Ride Out, Babes in the Dirt, and Stake Out Events taught you about people?

Humans are amazing. I’ve met some of the most incredible, inspiring, loving, and helpful people on this planet through event production. I’ve also met a handful of total psychos which have also brought me great joy! My fav psycho was a woman I met at Sierra Stake Out who was so drunk, she couldn’t read the schedule of events and went off on me that she missed the “shitty” tattoo contest, how it was all my fault, and the event totally sucked now. I asked her to hold on one sec while I got a manager and walked off never to return. My friend Bo had to listen to her spiral for another 10 minutes while I watched from behind a tree. He loved it, I loved it, and I still smile thinking of her. Side note, I understand I am here for anyone to voice their issues but just don’t do it after you’ve had a gallon of Sailor Jerry and are breathing straight fire in between a slur of words I can’t understand. Thank you in advance <3

Why do you think women’s only events are important to the world currently?

These ladies’ events diversify the motorcycle community.? Their purpose is to bring more riders together in a welcoming environment so they are more active within the culture and build a stronger community overall. The goal is to see women at all the shows, at all the rides & runs, and ripping lefts at all the races and its happening.

What is your least favorite misconception people have about the events, you host?

I’ve only gotten this a few times but those who asked if Babes Ride Out or Babes in the Dirt is a giant pillow fight. In their mind it’s hilarious and a great ice breaker, but to me, I assume they are a total moron who just can’t hold in their inner douche.

What would you say to someone who is thinking about getting into motorcycling?

Be realistic. Are you willing to take the safety class? Are you financially able to properly maintain the machine? Can you afford health insurance that covers not only accidents but physical therapy, additional expenses like wheelchairs, etc.? Are you willing to put the time and energy into becoming a better rider? If the answer is YES to all of the above, I’d say it’s a good start. Consider all the pros, cons, and understand it’s not something you’ll be badass at overnight. It takes years of practice and thousands of miles to get to a place of barely knowing what you are doing.

What is your favorite flavor of ice cream?

Mint chocolate chip

All photos by Colin Nearman @colin_nearman | colinnearman.com for 805 Beer @805beer | 805beer.com

Follow Ashmore‘s journey & Babes Ride Out on Instagram!

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Farewell To Rider Ralph Hudson http://www.qosb.cn/farewell-to-rider-ralph-hudson/ Wed, 09 Sep 2020 19:15:36 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45863 We’re deeply saddened to hear of the passing of fellow rider, Ralph Hudson. He was an amazing rider, father, friend, and he will be truly missed. Ralph died last night after battling his injuries sustained in a crash on the Bonneville Salt Flats on August 14th. Ralph leaves behind a legacy in the road, dirt, […]

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We’re deeply saddened to hear of the passing of fellow rider, Ralph Hudson. He was an amazing rider, father, friend, and he will be truly missed. Ralph died last night after battling his injuries sustained in a crash on the Bonneville Salt Flats on August 14th.
Ralph leaves behind a legacy in the road, dirt, and land speed motorcycle racing communities and will forever be known as the legend that set the fastest FIM World Record at 289mph in Bolivia.

Ralph Hudson, The Quiet Giant, Rest In Peace.

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Porsche Taylor: Rider, Creator of Black Girls Ride, Event Host, And All Round Badass http://www.qosb.cn/porsche-taylor-rider-creator-of-black-girls-ride-event-host-and-all-round-badass/ Tue, 08 Sep 2020 20:51:50 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45829 Interview By Becky Goebel Porsche has been a long time team member of Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys. You may have seen her on this blog before, or out on the streets surrounded by other bikes. She’s a self-made staple in the motorcycle industry and is known to bring together women who ride – especially black […]

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Interview By Becky Goebel

Porsche has been a long time team member of Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys. You may have seen her on this blog before, or out on the streets surrounded by other bikes. She’s a self-made staple in the motorcycle industry and is known to bring together women who ride – especially black women.

Porsche is the founder of Black Girls Ride and is a voice for black women who ride everywhere. She hosts many events and is a content, communications and marketing master. I knew about Porsche because of a shoot she did with the Women’s Moto Exhibit a couple years ago and when I moved to Long Beach, CA I would see her driving around in a Polaris Slingshot all over town – tunes blasting, custom paint, and a badass lady driver – you can’t miss her.

Although Porsche has been featured on this blog before, we decided to do an interview with her in her own voice in light of the Black Lives Matter movement. I wanted to ask her some real questions about how she feels about what’s going on right now after the murder of George Floyd and the uprise of Black voices, protests and the revolution that is going on in the world today.

Porsche was (not surprisingly) the first rider from the LA area to arrange a “Ride for Justice” in the name of George Floyd and to show support in the fight against Police Brutality and Systemic Racism. A poster began circulating social media announcing the meet-up and hundreds of people came out to show their support.

The Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorney’s blog platform is a great place to put Porsches words and thoughts and when you read through this – put yourself in Porsches shoes, for the last 17 years as a black woman rider in the California motorcycle community. Here we go!

Who are you and where are you from?

I am Porsche Taylor, Born in Honolulu, Hawaii and raised in Inglewood, CA

How long have you been riding bikes?

I have been riding for 17 years. My cousin influenced me to buy a bike, instead of a flat screen TV, and I never looked back. There was a large community of African American Riders in Southern California that started in the late 50s and it’s still going strong today. My first mentor was a black woman, who I met at a bike night. The first week I got my bike, I teetered into the parking lot, and she took me under her wing. Since then, I’ve met thousands of Black riders all over the world.

What exactly is Black Girls Ride?

Black Girls Ride is an online Magazine, highlighting women of color in motorsports. We began in 2011 and have grown into an international movement. While we are unapologetically black, we are all inclusive and love to showcase all women who ride.

What’s the biggest event you’ve hosted?

We host our annual ride to Essence Fest every year in New Orleans, where we bring over 200 riders from all over the country. Essence Fest is the largest celebration of African American Women in the world, and we are excited to bring the motorsports community to this event.

What’s your favorite event to attend?

I love any event or meet up where I can meet new riders!

Tell us about the Ride For Justice that you just hosted – it looked HUGE.

The Ride For Justice was essential to our SoCal riding community. We brought riders of all races, bike styles, and genders together to say out loud that Black Lives Matter. So often, the biker community is thought to be a hotbed of racist behavior. This ride showed that the road doesn’t know color. Motorcycling has brought us together with people from all walks of life. We had a fun, safe ride!

Here’s a recap video of their ride:

Poster from the ride
“Join the Movement!”

 

Have you seen a shift in the motorcycle industry for POC since the George Floyd murder?

Since Geroge Floyd’s murder, I have seen our colleagues stand up against racist behavior. We recognize the allies who speak up, instead of sitting silent among racist behavior. The community has begun a movement to embrace people of color in motorsports, now more than ever, and I think that’s so cool!

As a Person Of Color, how do you feel it’s different being a part of the motorcycle industry?

I’d honestly rather shine the light on the organizations that have embraced us as people of color, rather than to give fuel to stories about discrimination or exclusion. I absolutely love working with Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys. They have been supporting us way before it became trendy to do so. They have been present in the community, assisting all motorcycle riders who need legal assistance, helping them to get their fair share. I’m also thankful for Polaris and Indian Motorcycle. They have been instrumental in making sure we have the resources to host nationwide educational workshops, to help women become safer riders. I have great mentors like Sarah Schilke, Erin Sills, Alisa Clickenger, Sarah Moreau, and Patrice Johnson, each who contribute to motorsports and bringing this community of riders together.

How do you see things changing for POC in the motorcycle world?

When you no longer have to ask this question, we’ll be where we need to be. For now, I think the industry is realizing that people of color are a huge part of the marketplace, and it makes good business sense to embrace them as a part of the culture.

How do you feel about the world right now?

The world is in turmoil right now… We need to learn to embrace each other and help each other. That’s the only way out of this tailspin we’re in.

What would you like to see come from the BLM movement?

I would like to see an end to police brutality and I would like police who engage in illegal behavior held accountable for their actions. No one should be killed at a traffic stop or for a petty crime.

What events do you have coming up?

Our next ride is the All Girls On Ground Ride, in honor of our fallen sisters. This will take place on Aug 22, 2020. All Riders are welcome to attend! Get the details at allgirlsonground.eventbrite.com

How can people reach you if they’d like to team up with you, interview you or learn more about you and your brand/magazine?

You can find us online at blackgirlsride.com and @blackgirlsride on all social media.

Can you take me for a ride in your Slingshot?

Absolutely! Say When!

Thank you to Porsche for contributing to the making of this article. If you see her out at events or riding around, go say hi! Thanks Porsche and keep doing what you do!

Check out Porsche Taylor’s latest interview with Fox News.

Becky

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Veterans Charity Ride to Sturgis http://www.qosb.cn/veterans-charity-ride-to-sturgis/ Fri, 28 Aug 2020 23:07:14 +0000 http://www.qosb.cn/?p=45809 Photos courtesy of Sara Liberte The rumbling of 20 motorcycles on the open highway is a hell of a lot better than the rumble of diesel engines as you convoy through a war zone, but the sounds do bring similar emotions. You have a team of people you need to trust, because they are in […]

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Photos courtesy of Sara Liberte

The rumbling of 20 motorcycles on the open highway is a hell of a lot better than the rumble of diesel engines as you convoy through a war zone, but the sounds do bring similar emotions. You have a team of people you need to trust, because they are in formation with you and need to mind their blindspots. The enemy is unseen when on convoy, and on the road you don’t know which distracted driver will be the one to encroach on your lane. And when you’re driving through Utah in August, there’s the heat…so much heat.

But unlike convoys in Iraq, the Veterans Charity Ride to Sturgis (VCR) is something to look forward to and not dread. Now in year number six, this was my fourth time piloting a sidecar for the ride photographer as we took wounded and amputee veterans out for some wind therapy to the biggest biker rally in the world. This year would be different in many ways, but the biggest change would be due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. On the outset we weren’t sure how things would play out, but it turned out to be more of a blessing than a curse. The roads were less crowded, we had no mass gatherings (which can be exhausting for people with PTSD), and we even had a volunteer chef riding with us to make meals.

This had the effect of bringing the group together quickly, something that already happens quickly when you bring together war veterans who also share a love for motorcycling. Despite us all serving in different branches and different jobs, at different times and coming from different

backgrounds, we all put aside differences and focused on what brings us together, with the desire to be of service to community making everyone want to lend a helping hand. As one of the riders, Darius Wallace said, “if more of us were like this, our country wouldn’t be facing the problems it’s currently facing.”

More than just a motorcycle ride, the event starts outside Moab, Utah at the Red Cliffs Lodge. On a quiet bend of the Colorado River, the veterans get a chance to meet each other and swap stories before being introduced to the 2020 Indian motorcycle they’ll be riding to Sturgis. A day of basic training lets both novice and experienced riders familiarize themselves with the weight of these touring machines while trying out the ABS and traction control on an empty training range. A familiarization ride then allows everyone to feel out the dynamics of formation riding and for some of them to fish through the Ride Command touchscreen system (no point in having a Bluetooth enabled bike if you can’t pair your smartphone and blast your favorite tunes).

Another few days in Moab let everyone do some horseback riding and rafting, while an entire day is set aside to take off road vehicles on the slick rock of Hells Revenge. Offroad racer and Dakar Rally winner Casey Currie was there again with several friends to remind us that you can still have leather interiors and AC while crawling through tough terrain. This year we also had Mike of Big Iron Tour Co. with his heavily modified “deuce-and-a-half,” an old Army truck that most veterans remember as creaking old beasts. With the right mods and some decent seats everyone had a great time, and instead of MRE’s for lunch we all stopped at Rotary Park for a homemade lunch, care of Sherry Billings.

Out on the slick rock of Moab.

But Sturgis was calling and we left the heat of Utah in search of Colorado’s higher altitudes. We didn’t find it right away, but eventually some storm clouds posted up beside us and blocked the sun. Craig, CO was our stop on the first day and we hung out at the local VFW post, #4265, for a dinner and a small gathering, which felt big since everyone had to be spaced out for health reasons. In the morning we headed to the Craig Memorial Hospital to drop off some PPE to the hospital staff there. We had brought several boxes of individual kits containing gloves, masks, and packets of hand sanitizer so that hospital staff could use them or give them to patients with pre-existing conditions that make them more susceptible to coronavirus.

Outside the VFW meeting the locals.
Group photo outside Craig Memorial.

From there we continued on Hwy 40 and got in some of the best riding of our adventure. Persistent storm clouds followed us but never opened up, giving perpetual shade as we followed the Poudre river on a winding path, alternating between tight canyons and panoramic views.

Finally we got some light rain but it wasn’t worth putting on rain gear, eventually turning into tiny hail pellets for a few minutes before petering out. In Ft. Collins, CO we stopped for the night, spending some time at the Veterans Memorial Park there. The people at Healing Hands provided acupuncture and massage to ease both the soreness from the road and old battle wounds that were acting up.

The weather cooperated almost the entire trip.

From there the ride moved north into the flatter land of Wyoming, where wind is plentiful and humans are scarce. It seemed like the official summertime sport of Wyoming is road construction so we encountered a fair bit of traffic, but the veterans took it all in stride and having some empty, straight stretches of road are a great way to let the mind wander and the soul lighten. That is, until a hay truck going 80mph the other way tries to blow you out of your lane. In Casper, WY we spent the night and had dinner at the Oil City Brewery. Craft beer and pizza so good it could hold its own in the most hipster-filled metro area was not what we expected, but we all ate and drank our fill before settling in for the night. Tomorrow would be our run into Sturgis.

This is the first time the VCR came into Sturgis from the west side, which gave us a chance to see Devil’s Tower and stop for lunch at the Campstool Cafe. The roads were beginning to switch from straight line to flowing, following the wandering hills that indicated we were nearing our destination. After fueling up in Spearfish, SD the group wandered into Sturgis proper. Traffic was already picking up even though the rally hadn’t officially started, but the amount of traffic on Main St. also seemed lower than years past, probably due to COVID-19; with this being an anniversary year you would expect to see things already at capacity.

Outside the Devil’s Tower.

After a great welcome party and dinner at Indian Motorcycle of Sturgis and an hour of roaming Main St., we motored to our cabins outside of Deadwood. This has been our Sturgis Rally base since the beginning, and it’s a perfect mix of the quiet rustling of the wind through the trees and the distant rumble of big V-twins on the highway a mile away. With no huge meetings or group rides planned the veterans were able to find their own fun, riding the Black Hills and doing the obligatory stops at Mt. Rushmore, the Crazy Horse monument site, and a ride through Custer State Park to do some buffalo spotting.

The usual Black Hills weather meant things were fairly hot, but afternoon storms would come through and cool things down. Fireside chats and a few drinks were had in the evenings, small groups ventured off to check out Deadwood and Sturgis, and we quickly set into a rhythm. As a group it’s always interesting to watch veterans when they get together. As a veteran of the Iraq War myself I feel like an outsider in most groups I move through. But with veterans there is an instant connection; the coarse language and harmless ribbing makes fast friends instead of

drawing sideways glances. But unlike on active duty, vets tend to be far more understanding of each other. The ability to talk about the horrors of combat and to laugh about that one time they accidentally shot a camel with a MK19 grenade launcher just can’t be replicated outside of that tight-knit circle.

Also, unlike group therapy sessions, vets can talk openly and candidly around the fireside or at gas stops while on the road. No one is guiding the conversations and no outcome is expected: you can just talk. There’s a tendency among veterans to keep quiet about what they’ve seen or done, requiring them to shoulder a lot of feelings that can weigh anyone down. Stopping to unpack that stuff can often remind us that there isn’t a need to have so much weight on our shoulders.

The ride is now over and the veterans are all back home, settled into their routines. But the group text is still alive with jokes and stories and people checking in to make sure everyone is alright. And that right there is the magic of Veterans Charity Ride. While time on the bike can untie the knots in our minds, it’s sharing stories and experiences that creates part of our sense of self. When it’s all said and done, it’s better to look back on the things we’ve done instead of the things we wished we had done.

Photo: Johnny Killmore.

To learn more about the Veteran’s Charity Ride, visit them at www.veteranscharityride.org

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